Mohammad Ali Talpur

Mohammad Ali Talpur is a well known contemporary Pakistani artist. He is considered as the only minimalist artist in Pakistan because of his linear drawings. He is teaching at National College of Arts and works at his studio in Lahore.

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Hunt Slonem

Hunt Slonem is an American painter, sculptor, and printmaker. He is best known for his Neo-Expressionist paintings of butterflies, bunnies, and his tropical birds, often based on a personal aviary in which he has been keeping from 30 to over 100 live birds of various species.

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Auguste Rodin

François Auguste René Rodin was a French sculptor generally considered the founder of modern sculpture. He was schooled traditionally and took a craftsman-like approach to his work. Rodin possessed a unique ability to model a complex, turbulent, and deeply pocketed surface in clay.

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Katrin Fridriks

Drawing influences from contemporary pop art, graffiti, and the calligraphic arts, Katrin Fridriks paints hyperkinetic abstract compositions filled with swirls of vibrant color, as well as large-scale installations that address environmental and political issues such as genetic research and the exhaustion of natural resources. Fridriks has painted monochromatic works—black on white, and white on black—as well as color-rich compositions whose tangles of drips and brushstrokes have drawn comparisons with the paintings of Jackson Pollock. She has also created work for commercial brands including Land Rover and Ralph Lauren.

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Marieta Chirulescu

Marieta Chirulescu’s work is the result of an ongoing preoccupation with the aesthetic and conceptual contingencies of painting. The abstractions for which she is best known reference the formalism of Color Field painting, superimposed with the array of digital printing methods available to the public today. Drawing from an extensive archive of imagery, Chirulescu uses scans, screen shots and the technical irregularities that occur throughout digital processes to alter personal photographs as well as those taken by her father during the Romanian dictatorship.

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Leo Gabin

Artist collective Leo Gabin (consisting of Lieven Deconinck, Gaëtan Begerem, and Robin De Vooght) redefines the tradition of found-object art by harvesting and recycling digital content into new configurations. Working across video, digital media, drawing, print, painting, and sculpture, they fashion their work directly from the internet’s unending proliferation of social networking content and images of celebrities, sex, and violence, often physically incorporating printed or downloaded content into their practice. The group are perhaps best known for their satirical video montages and frenzied, calligraphic, partially collaged abstract paintings, the latter revealing the influence of street art.

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Bernard Aubertin

Bernard Aubertin was a French artist born in 1934 in Fontenay-aux-Roses, France. He died in August 2015 in Reutlingen, Germany. He met Yves Klein in 1957 and joined the Zero movement during the 1960-1961 period. One of his text was published in the Zero magazine, vol 3. July 1961.

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Sam Moyer

All of Sam Moyer’s multimedia projects have a common quality of borrowing images or materials from everyday life, and manipulating them or reproducing them into abstraction. With a background in photography, Moyer makes works that are monochromatic, modular, and rooted in geometry, with a focus on texture, pattern, and tactility. For example, her “Worry Rug” series (2009) is made from cheaply purchased Ikea rugs that she then dyed and picked apart, while another series of drawings uses pocket-sized book covers as their basis. Moyer has also become well known for using dyed and crumpled stretches of fabric that she mounts onto wood panels by ironing. These pieces frequently have subtle patterns created using bleach and ink.

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Katja Novitskova

Katja Novitskova (born 1984 in Tallinn, Estonia) is an Estonian installation artist. She lives and works in Amsterdam and Berlin. Her work focuses on issues of technology, evolutionary processes, digital imagery and corporate aesthetics. Novitskova is interested in investigating how, “media actively redefines the world and culture, and everything” related to art, nature and commerce.

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Andrew Birk

Andrew Birk’s practice loops broadly from the traditional two-dimensional surface to writing, sound, fashion, photography, and digital media, and then back to painting; harnessing the noise by which today’s dissolving parameters sing. Often involving a sensory experience, Birk’s work articulates complex scenarios and stimuli through the course of vigorous research. 

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Svetlana Bogatcheva

Svetlana Bogatcheva (1986) is a contemporary artist based in Vaasa, Finland. Her works have been shown at the Royal Academy of Arts Summer Exhibition in London (2015), exhibited in the U.K. and Finland, and reside in collections in Scandinavia, UK, Brazil, Kuwait, Canada and the USA. She employs sustainable natural, post-industrial and post-consumer materials like textile, rubber, plastic, stone, bitumen, earth and ash. Her conceptually based practise merges the worlds of sculpture and painting, working in a dynamic manner that is defined by her impeccable skills in forming materials into works that invite deep contemplation and presence.

The Rebirth series is one of Svetlana’s most iconic works, boldly engaging the spectator’s attention in interpreting the rich formations in texture and colour. The form is dictated by the process and expresses the journey taken by the post-consumer materials. Fused with the artist’s desire to create works that capture light from multi-faceted perspectives, the intricate sculptural forms exude the energy, possibility, and positivity of the start of new life. The Rebirth sculptures are beacons of creativity and innovation that continually inspire and generate new forms in an ongoing, dynamic interplay as the spectator moves around them.

Equally engaging, Svetlana’s mesmerizing canvas works create conceptual landscapes where colour, form and tactility co-exist in inspired harmony. The poetic structures and shapes are enigmatically welcoming, inviting the audience to interpret the works in their own time and pace. This democratic quality defines Svetlana’s practise as a whole: a practise that places her audience in the driver’s seat, allowing each viewer to determine the narrative and how the work is to be viewed and, ultimately, perceived. Her works invite themselves into our lives in a gentle yet impactful way, creating both space and meaning as they convey a sense of breathing that is almost audible, via her deft and delicate use of materials. The overall composition of each canvas orchestrates a delightful interplay between form and structure in equal parts, where colour becomes a protagonist in the eye of the beholder.

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Pipilotti Rist

Pipilotti Elisabeth Rist is a Swiss visual artist best known for creating experimental video art and installation art. Her work is often described as surreal, intimate, abstract art, having a preoccupation with the female body. Her artwork is often categorized as feminist art.

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David Kim Whittaker

Celebrated British artist David Kim Whittaker is self-taught, born in Cornwall in 1964 and still through fidelity to his own environment living and working in the area. Whittaker’s work achieved breakthrough status with his interpretation of the human head and its metaphysical mental core. These works often juggle states of inner and outer calm and conflict – offering a glimpse of strength and fragility, the conscious and the subconscious, the masculine and the feminine. Into this realm Whittaker has increasingly brought historical questions of identity, abstraction and juxtaposition. Whittaker has achieved international critical recognition and has exhibited nationally and internationally, a reception that has also been mirrored commercially. Self Portrait Four, a 2011 Oil, acrylic on canvas sold for £81,250 at Phillips in March 2018. Furthermore, “Boys Ascends”, 2013 a work in mixed media sold for £46,761 in December 2018 at Christie’s in Paris.

In an essay for an exhibition at Fondazione Mudima, the curator and writer Joseph Clarke observes that the differing techniques of Whittaker’s practice ‘denote conflict but also manifest a place where fusion and harmony exist.’ Inside this vortex, Whittaker creates a strange harmony, a world forged from his own imagination and memory but recognisable instantly to the viewer, too; unsettling, but comprehensible. The series exhibited here comes from the beginning of this important period in the artist’s development. Executed in 2007-08, these paintings are original works in series of 20 unique variants. Here we see Whittaker’s fine sense of abstract composition with each work of oil and graphite on paper laid on card, evoking powerful and different emotional and receptive states.

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Alex Katz

Alex Katz (born July 24, 1927), is an American figurative artist known for his paintings, sculptures, and prints.

Katz’s paintings are divided almost equally into the genres of portraiture and landscape. Since the 1960s he has painted views of New York (especially his immediate surroundings in Soho), the landscapes of Maine, where he spends several months every year, as well as portraits of family members, artists, writers and New York society protagonists. His paintings are defined by their flatness of colour and form, their economy of line, and their cool but seductive emotional detachment. A key source of inspiration is the woodcuts produced by Japanese artist Kitagawa Utamaro.

In the early 1960s, influenced by films, television, and billboard advertising, Katz began painting large-scale paintings, often with dramatically cropped faces. Ada Katz, whom he married in 1958, has been the subject of over 250 portraits throughout his career. To make one of his large works, Katz paints a small oil sketch of a subject on a masonite board; the sitting might take an hour and a half. He then makes a small, detailed drawing in pencil or charcoal, with the subject returning, perhaps, for the artist to make corrections. Katz next blows up the drawing into a “cartoon,” sometimes using an overhead projector, and transfers it to an enormous canvas via “pouncing”—a technique used by Renaissance artists, involving powdered pigment pushed through tiny perforations pricked into the cartoon to recreate the composition on the surface to be painted. Katz pre-mixes all his colors and gets his brushes ready. Then he dives in and paints the canvas—12 feet wide by 7 feet high or even larger—in a session of six or seven hours.

Beginning in the late 1950s, Katz developed a technique of painting on cut panels, first of wood, then aluminum, calling them “cutouts”. These works would occupy space like sculptures, but their physicality is compressed into planes, as with paintings. In later works, the cutouts are attached to wide, U-shaped aluminum stands, with a flickering, cinematic presence enhanced by warm spotlights. Most are close-ups, showing either front-and-back views of the same figure’s head or figures who regard each other from opposite edges of the stand.

After 1964, Katz increasingly portrayed groups of figures. He would continue painting these complex groups into the 1970s, portraying the social world of painters, poets, critics, and other colleagues that surrounded him. He began designing sets and costumes for choreographer Paul Taylor in the early 1960s, and he has painted many images of dancers throughout the years. One Flight Up (1968) consists of more than 30 portraits of some of the leading lights of New York’s intelligentsia during the late 1960s, such as the poet John Ashbery, the art critic Irving Sandler and the curator Henry Geldzahler, who championed Andy Warhol. Each portrait is painted using oils on both sides of a sliver of aluminium that has then been cut into the shape of the subject’s head and shoulders. The silhouettes are arranged predominantly in four long rows on a plain metal table.

After his Whitney exhibition in 1974, Katz focused on landscapes stating “I wanted to make an environmental landscape, where you were IN it.” In the late 1980s, Katz took on a new subject in his work: fashion models in designer clothing, including Kate Moss and Christy Turlington. “I’ve always been interested in fashion because it’s ephemeral,” he said.

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Katherine Bernhardt

Katherine Bernhardt first garnered the art world’s attention with her portraits of fashion models, exploring hyperreal fashion photography and mainstream notions of beauty. More recently, she has focused her energies on a series of “Pattern Paintings”—large-scale works in tropical, sherbert hues depicting banal consumer goods, arranged in the style of jazz patterns. Fluid and hurried, Bernhardt’s canvases are seemingly provisional, radiating energy so as to express the pleasure of art-making. First exploring patterns in the context of imported rugs, Bernhardt’s more recent works stem from an interest in Dutch wax printing and the all-over patterning of African textiles. Her subjects are selected and grouped according to underlying emotional associations—whether hamburgers, french fries, and basketballs; or coffee, cigarettes, and pizza—and broken down into elemental details, pure forms, and swaths of color to build simpler, yet expressive, arrangements.

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Matt Mullican

Using his subconscious as material, Matt Mullican often creates his artworks before an audience while under hypnosis, resulting in a unique hybrid of performance art and drawing. Part schematic, part cosmological chart, Mullican’s ordered, symmetrical works belie an enormously ambitious artistic aim, to contain and make sense of the universe. Characterized by rough geometric patterns and the artist’s elongated, looping script, Mullican’s spontaneous diagrams and writings on walls and canvas offer free access to the artist’s psyche.

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Joe Bradley

Joe Bradley is an artist based in New York City. Bradley was born in Kittery, Maine. He makes casualist paintings resembling human figures from assembled canvases which reference Color Field painting and Minimalism.

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Peter Sutherland

Colorado-raised and NYC-based, Peter Sutherland employs techniques of traditional documentary photography to capture the hidden beauty of ordinary objects and everyday situations. His work can be found in the pages of Vice, The New Order, Dazed & Confused, ANP Quarterly, and Monster Children, and for clients like Supreme, Converse, Nike, Adidas, Nordstrom, Manhattan Portage, The North Face, Vans, Stussy, Filson, Thule, Lacoste, Palladium, P.A.M., and No.6. Sutherland’s favorite director is Werner Herzog, and his own film work has been influenced by both Herzog and Albert & David Maysles’ Gimme Shelter. In addition to Tierney Gearon: The Mother Project (Zeitgeist Films), Peter directed Pedal (powerHouse Books DVD). He’s published several monographs to critical acclaim and exhibited works at Art Basel Miami and in galleries such as White Cube (London), V1 (Copenhagen), Someday Gallery (Melbourne), ATM and Mountain Fold Galleries (New York), and Gallery Target (Tokyo). When Sutherland is not taking pictures or making films he enjoys playing soccer and shredding pow.

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Grear Patterson

Grear Patterson works with arrangements of custom made image carriers, works in which he establishes connections with art history as well as with his own specific living environment. He became known for his ‘Duck Test’-series, canvasses organized to resemble smileys, their trendy lightness connoting a carefree attitude to life, while simultaneously referring to the icons of digital communication. His first sunsets were inspired by Hollywood movies, the sun’s immersion in the horizon mostly taking place within a 16:9 or 4:3 format. These works pick up on the form of the setting sun through the shape of the composition. The combination of the different colors on the raw canvas evokes spatial depth and conjures up sporadic associations with rainbows or figments of imagination.

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Don Brown

Don Brown is a sculptor best known for his dedication to varied depictions of his wife, Yoko. Since 1999, Brown has been producing three-quarter or half-scale portraits of Yoko using a classical tradition of representational sculpture, but without heroism or idealization. The figure, almost always with downcast or closed eyes, appears in various states of dress—sometimes obscured entirely in a sheet. Brown is perhaps most celebrated for his technical virtuosity, demonstrated by the freestanding balance and pristinely smooth surfaces in both bronze and acrylic works, and his attention to minute detail. Brown also has explored the tradition of still lifes in his large-scale and sensuous renderings of fruit and eggs. More recently, he has also begun to work with drawing in pastel, which also feature Yoko as its sole subject.

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Katharina Grosse

Katharina Grosse is a German artist. As an artist, Grosse’s work employs a use of architecture, sculpture and painting. She is known for her large-scale, site-related installations to create immersive visual experiences

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Isaac Brest

Isaac Brest, who received his professional training in film, is best known for works in photography and installation. He is involved in The Still House Group artist organization, which he founded with Alex Perweiler in 2007 in order to foster “creative sustainability” for future generations of artists seeking non-traditional career progressions. Brest’s own conceptually based works present wry commentary on contemporary art practice by incorporating elements of architecture and film; he also works frequently with industrial materials like sheet rock, sanding tools, Plexiglas, and plywood.

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Tamuna Sirbiladze

Sirbiladze was born in Tbilisi in Georgia. She studied art at the Tbilisi State Academy of Arts (1989–1994) in Georgia and later the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna (1997–2003) and Slade School of Fine Art, London, 2003. She was the widow of fellow artist Franz West (1947–2012) and collaborated with West on a number of projects.

Sirbiladze’s background influenced her approach to painting: “Sirbiladze was exposed to art mostly through books‍—‌her home country had few museums. She knew early on that she wanted to be an artist, however, and cited the colors of the art she came across as the reason she ended up painting.” She told Forbes in a 2015 interview, “Searching for light and color is my main engagement”.

Sirbiladze made paintings known for their speed, and she sometimes incorporated text into her work. Her characteristic style merged the figurative and the gestural. Her paintings have been described as “highly expressive” with splashes of color “forming abstracted figures and patterns.” An Art in America review, a year before her death at age 45, remarks on the “energetic content” of her work, saying “Sirbiladze’s line is spare; abundant, creamy negative space supports the gentle diagonal flow of marks” anchored by unexpected forms. Critic Alex Greenberger said, “Sirbiladze’s paintings played with the division between figuration and abstraction, often melding the two in ambiguous images. Genitalia and bodies can be glanced in some, while in others, objects like jugs and fruits seem to materialize. Sirbiladze’s paintings recall the work of Henri Matisse and the Impressionists in their light, expressive brushwork.”

Hugh Scott Douglas

Hugh Scott-Douglas was born in 1988, in Cambridge, England, Scott-Douglas moved to Edmonton, Canada, with his family as a young child, and later grew up in Ottawa. In his late teens, he studied briefly in the pre-college program at the Pratt Institute in Brooklyn before completing his BFA in sculpture at the Ontario College of Art and Design in 2010. He now lives and works in Brooklyn.

One of his Galleries puts it very well: Scott-Douglas’ work “situates itself at the confluence of a number of critical, socio-political, economic and aesthetic observations and investigations. Interrogating tensions between analogue and digital modes of production, he makes use of a wide range of techniques and media, from laser cutting, inkjet printing and photography, to numerical data and satellite mapping software. Across his practice, Scott-Douglas investigates the possibilities and limitations of the production of the photographic image at a turning point in the medium’s history, as it makes the conversion from modes of mechanical reproduction towards digital technologies. While formally elements of Scott-Douglas’ visual language resonate with recent developments in painting – particularly the process-orientated vocabulary of conceptual abstraction – his use of photographic media, from the old-fashioned cyanotype process favoured in his early career, to a juxtaposition of digital and print formats, reveals the close relationship his work shares with both the legacy and future of photography.”

Scott -Douglas has held solo exhibitions at Casey Kaplan in New York, Gallery Baton in Seoul and Blum and Poe in Tokyo and Los Angeles and Jessica Silverman Gallery (San Francisco). In addition he has participated in group shows at the Cordova Sculpture Park and Museum (Boston), the Museum of Contemporary Canadian Art (Toronto), and most recently at the Eli and Edythe Broad Art Museum at Michigan State University. His work is also featured in several public collections, including the Dallas Museum of Art. He is among the most closely watched artists to emerge in recent years.

Jack Greer

Jack Greer is an aspiring American artist born in 1987, known for his work in a range of mediums, including drawing, photography, sculpture, and apparel design. The artist combines wall-mounted collages, sculpture, and installations with materials such as ink, dirt, blood, thread, and paint.

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Chris Succo

German born artist Chris Succo (1979) attended the Kunstakademie Düsseldorf, where he was awarded Meisterschüler by Prof. Georg Herold in 2009, and the Royal College of Art, graduating from the latter in 2012. He has exhibited internationally and continuously since his graduation and is in many important international collections. He is one of the foremost contemporary continental painters working in the abstract/minimalist tradition.

Chris Succo’s crisp, cool abstraction is so wide-ranging that, as author Christopher Schreck has noted, a single exhibition could look like a group show. Yet whether the German artist is working in lacquered aluminum and oil on canvas or creating sculpture with steel piping, mesh, or boxing equipment, his work shares certain commonalities: a quest to find individuality within the repetition of forms and techniques, elements of appropriation (including the titles of his series), and a minimalist palette largely comprised of matte black and white. Some of the brighter works in his oeuvre, the “Flag Pieces” consist of three diagonal bands of color and texture created by applying lacquer to black-and-white photographs. In these, Succo divides the canvas in a style reminiscent of Hard-Edged painting, as well as Succo’s own “Nu Era” series of black-and-white lacquered aluminum works.

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Tobias Madison

Tobias Madison is a Swiss artist, known for his multidisciplinary conceptual art, moving image work, and performance art. His work frequently uses video, photography, text and installation to probe the economy of interpersonal relations in mediated realities. Madison lives and works in New York City.

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Stephen Shore

Stephen Shore is an American photographer known for his images of banal scenes and objects in the United States, and for his pioneering use of color in art photography. His books include Uncommon Places and American Surfaces, photographs that he took on cross-country road trips in the 1970s.

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Gillian Ayres

Gillian Ayres OBE (Officer of the Order of the British Empire) was one of the most significant abstract painters to emerge in London during the postwar period. A disciple and vanguard of the taschist style, a non-geometric abstract style that developed in postwar Europe, Ayres was inspired by abstract expressionist art in the United States and painted in a lyrical, gestural style that stood in contrast to the hard-edge forms of her contemporaries. Ayres’s career attests to her experimental spirit, as she switched from oil to acrylic paints for much of the 1960s and early 1970s—creating textured surfaces—only to later return to oil. In recent years, the artist has experimented with woodcuts, creating ebullient works evocative of Henri Matisse. Never didactic, her oeuvre illustrates an artist constantly experimenting with the possibilities of paint. “My paintings are about painting, about shape and color, not telling stories,” Ayres has said.

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Asger Jorn

Danish artist and author Asger Jorn, along with Guy Debord, played a pivotal role in the early development of the revolutionary movement Situationist International. Jorn began his artistic career as a painter in Paris, and he became radicalized after joining the communist resistance movement during the Second World War. He played an integral part in launching a number of movements that combined the tenets of Marxism with artistic expression, including COBRA, the International Movement for an Imaginist Bauhaus, and later, after leaving Debord’s group, a breakaway Scandinavian movement called Second Situationist International. Jorn was incredibly prolific as an artist across all mediums, creating painting, sculpture, ceramics, and collage. In 1964 he was awarded, but turned down, the Guggenheim Award.

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Ai WeiWei

Ai Weiwei is a Chinese contemporary artist and activist. Ai grew up in the far north-west of China, where he lived under harsh conditions due to his father’s exile. As an activist, he has been openly critical of the Chinese Government’s stance on democracy and human rights.

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Mark Titchner

Mark Titchner (b. 1973, UK) lives and works in London and was the 2006 nominee for the Turner Prize. Focusing on an exploration of words and language, in recent years much of his production has been based in the public realm both in the UK and internationally. His work has been exhibited at Venice Biennale and is held in the permanent collections of the Arts Council England, British Council, South London Gallery, the United Kingdom Government Art Collection and the Tate Gallery.

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Stephen Prina

Stephen Prina, an artist whose deconstructive and playful approach to culture, art, language, and authorship often begets the label “post-Conceptualist”, addresses the institutions, markets, and historiography that shape our perception of art. Believing an artwork “only has meaning when it enters the social sphere and meets its audience,” Prina’s artistic practice includes installations, performance, sculpture, and painting that centers on what happens to art when it leaves the studio. For instance, he conceived a traveling spectacle for the 2008 Whitney Biennial, in which he mouthed lyrics appropriated from public testimonials by contributors. “His exhibition making can be seen as a kind of overarching work itself,” wrote critic Dominic Eichler. “Certainly, his fastidious and almost exaggerated attention to framing, labeling, forms of display, presentation and cataloguing seem to approach institutional parody without being overtly didactic.”

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Michiel Ceulers

Michiel Ceulers’s process-oriented abstract paintings are known for bearing evidence of their mistreatment in the artist’s studio, where he routinely stacks paintings against one another before they are fully dry. Often tearing, taping, sanding, and puncturing his canvases, Ceulers’s works feature imperfect geometric shapes and patterns, a playful engagement with art historical styles. “For the Love Birds” (2010) series, Ceulers affixed two paintings side by side, mismatched in size and color, evoking the randomness of human encounters.

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Allen Jones

Allen Jones RA is a British pop artist best known for his paintings, sculptures, and lithography. He was awarded the Prix des Jeunes Artistes at the 1963 Paris Biennale. He is a Senior Academician at the Royal Academy of Arts.

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Lynn Chadwick

Lynn Russell Chadwick, CBE RA was an English sculptor and artist. Much of his work is semi-abstract sculpture in bronze or steel. His work is in the collections of MoMA in New York, the Tate in London and the Centre Georges Pompidou in Paris.

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Michael Staniak

Michael Staniak is an Australian artist whose experimental, digital media-inspired paintings explore process, materiality, and abstraction in a digital era. His interests are aligned with artists who use digital strategies to create objects or make works of art inspired by the culture of the web.

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Ruairiadh O’Connell

London-based O’Connell’s work investigates the psychological functions of design in all its manifestations, from abstract patterns through domestic interiors to landscape architecture.

In the past he has explored casino carpets and aeroplane seat fabric, designed to keep gamblers excited or distract from a fear of flying. For Frieze he will be presenting works inspired by the uniforms and flags of Japanese Hikeshi firemen from the Edo period.

The artist’s ‘wax paintings’ consist of cropped patterns that have been silkscreened onto industrial wax. The wax itself has been infused with oil pigments and poured into steel frames; as it hardens he “massages” the surface, a gesture that creates valleys that the patterns fall into.

His ‘railing sculptures’ appear to be traditional metal fences that have been invaded by a mysteriously textured substance. Between each custom-welded vertical bar is a mesh that supports jesmonite, a water-based resin that is moulded and coloured by contact with lace privacy curtains.

His playfulness with medium and form contrasts the research and investigations inherent in his practice. Works are both painterly and sculptural, made seductive through texture and colour, and we are excited to see what he does next.

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Zhu Tian 朱田

China born, London-based artist Zhu Tian received an MA in Sculpture from the Royal College of Art in London, the UK (2014), an MA in Sound Design from Bournemouth University in Bournemouth, the UK (2007), and a BA in Economics from the University of Nottingham in Nottingham, the UK (2006). Moving effortlessly from object intervention to digital to performance to set piece installation, she presents works embodying discourse around the theme of power relations, freedom and individualism. Concerned by the automated routines of robotic individuals in today’s society, Zhu creates pieces which she describes as “hiccups – to interrupt and disturb.” Her work combines light humour with a sharp sense of critique, and is known for being ‘compelling and unsettling’.

Zhu has exhibited internationally at such venues as the V&A Museum in London, the UK, the Palais de Tokyo in Paris, France and the Centraal Museum in Utrecht, Netherlands. She was the winner of the Catlin Art Prize (UK) in 2015, the Broomhill National Sculpture Prize (UK) in 2014, and was selected as the Emerging Sound Artist in the UK in 2009.

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Jonas Wood

In his paintings, drawings, and prints, Jonas Wood merges references to art history, his memories, and visions of the people, objects, and settings that compose the fabric of his life. Working in acrylic and oil on supports including cardboard and canvas, he presents portraits of his friends and family, interior scenes, and still lifes. Through his partially abstract rendering of these subjects and use of bright colors, he emphasizes patterns and forms while flattening out the space in his compositions. Ceramic vessels and potted plants figure prominently in his works. In some, he covers the outside of a plant’s pot with an intricately realized landscape, which reads as a painting within a painting. Working with an eye toward his predecessors, Wood cites Lucian Freud, David Hockney, and Alex Katz as influences, claiming, “All three of them are superheroes.”

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Emilio Tadini

Emilio Tadini (b. 1927 – d. 2002 Milan, Italy) is considered one of the most original personalities of Italy’s post- World War II cultural landscape. A Poet, novelist, essayist, art critic, journalist and painter, he is, in the words of friend and contemporary Umberto Eco, “A writer who paints, a painter who writes.”

In 1947 he debuted with a poem in Elio Vittorini’s magazine Politecnico, which was followed by intense critical and theoretical writings on art. From 1963 to 1993 Tadini published four novels and a volume of poems. It was alongside his critical and literary work, from the late 1950s Tadini began to paint. His first solo exhibition was in 1961 at the Galleria del Cavallino in Venice, and then in 1965, in a group show, together with Mario Schifano, Valerio Adami and Lucio Del Pezzo at the newly opened Studio Marconi in Milan. 

Although stylistically ‘Pop’ Tadini, rather than the superficial gloss of American Pop Art, was greater interested in the more introspective, personal, and at times intellectual British Pop Art such as Peter Blake, David Hockney and Allen Jones, but also to that of Francis Bacon, Patrick Caufield, Ronald Kitaj, and the figurative narratives of Valerio Adami and Hervé Télémaque.

During the 1970s he had solo exhibitions in Paris, Stockholm, Brussels, London, Antwerp, the United States and Latin America, both in private galleries and museums. In 1978 and 1982 Tadini participated in the Venice Biennale, and in 1986 he had a large solo exhibition at the Rotonda di via Besana in Milan. From autumn 1995 to the summer of 1996 a major retrospective took place in the museums of Stralsund, Bochum and Darmstad. In spring 2005, the Villa dei Cedri Museum in Bellinzona had a large posthumous retrospective of his work. The Mayor Gallery in London from whom this wonderful bio is taken had an extensive exhibition of his work in February and March 2020.

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Julian Opie

Julian Opie was born in 1958 in London and graduated in 1983 from Goldsmiths School of Art, where he was taught by Michael Craig-Martin. He lives and works in London.

The work of Julian Opie is known throughout the world. With public commissions from New York to Seoul, London to Zurich, and an uninterrupted flow of international museum exhibitions, Opie’s distinctive formal language is instantly recognisable and reflects his artistic preoccupation with the idea of representation and the means by which images are perceived and understood. “Everything you see is a trick of the light,” Opie writes. “Light bouncing into your eye, light casting shadows, creating depth, shapes, colours. Turn off the light and it’s all gone. We use vision as a means of survival and it’s essential to take it for granted in order to function, but awareness allows us to look at looking and by extension look at ourselves and be aware of our presence. Drawing, drawing out the way that process feels and works brings the awareness into the present and into the real world, the exterior world.” Always exploring different techniques both cutting edge and ancient, Opie plays with ways of seeing through reinterpreting the vocabulary of everyday life; his reductive style evokes both a visual and spatial experience of the world around us. Drawing influence from classical portraiture, Egyptian hieroglyphs and Japanese woodblock prints, as well as public signage, information boards and traffic signs, the artist connects the clean visual language of modern life, with the fundamentals of art history.

Exhibitions have been staged at Berardo Museum, Lisbon, Portugal (2020); Tokyo Opera City Art Gallery, Japan (2019); Gerhardsen Gerner, Oslo, Norway (2019); The National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, Australia (2018); National Portrait Gallery, London, UK (2017); Suwon Ipark Museum of Art, Korea (2017); Fosun Foundation, Shanghai, China (2017); Fundacion Bancaja, Valencia, Spain (2017); Kunsthalle Helsinki, Finland (2015); Museum of Contemporary Art Krakow (MoCAK), Poland (2014); National Portrait Gallery, London, UK (2011); IVAM, Valencia, Spain (2010);

Works

Sterling Ruby

Sterling Ruby (born January 21, 1972) is an American artist who works in a large variety of media including ceramics, painting, drawing, collage, sculpture, video, and textiles. Often, his work is presented in large and densely packed installations. The artist has cited a diverse range of sources and influences including aberrant psychologies (particularly schizophrenia and paranoia), urban gangs and graffiti, hip-hop culture, craft, punk, masculinity, violence, public art, prisons, globalization, American domination and decline, waste and consumption. In opposition to the minimalist artistic tradition and influenced by the ubiquity of urban graffiti, the artist’s works often appear scratched, defaced, camouflaged, dirty, or splattered. Proclaimed as one of the most interesting artists to emerge this century by New York Times art critic Roberta Smith, Ruby’s work examines the psychological space where individual expression confronts social constraint.

Works

Adam McEwan

Adam McEwen is a contemporary British artist whose Conceptual pieces fall between painting, sculpture, and installation. His most famous works might be his obituaries written for living luminaries—Jeff Koons and Kate Moss among them—subverting his prior work as author of these announcements. The black-and-white prints echo the layout and sentiment of real journalism, yet McEwen’s fictions offer alternative views of celebrity. “An obituary is a narrative of someone’s decisions…. And in a sense it’s optimistic, and in another sense it’s impossible, and that’s like making art,” McEwen has said of the series. Born on February 9, 1965 in London, England, McEwen received a BA in English literature at Christ Church College, Oxford University, before studying at the California Institute of the Arts in 1991. Currently living and working in New York, NY, the artist transforms ordinary objects, such as ATMs and air conditioners, and ideas through inventive use of materials, typography, and presentation.

Works

Nicolas Party

Nicolas Party (born 1980 in Lausanne, Switzerland) lives and works in New York. He is one of the rising stars of the contemporary art market and already has a global presence and following. He is both widely collected and exhibited and is perhaps the most popular and respected artist of his generation. These small masterworks are gifted to those who work with him, they are unique entirely hand painted works in a series which varies upon the chosen theme. 

Party works across a wide range of different media. Primarily known for his colour-saturated paintings and murals, he also makes painted sculptures, pastels, installations, prints and drawings, and works as a curator. Party often paints landscapes, portraits and still lifes of everyday objects, which he strips of all extraneous detail. Rather than creating faithful depictions from nature, he uses these seemingly innocuous subjects as springboards for an exploration into the art of painting itself. His concerns lie, therefore, less in the accurate depiction of nature, and more in its translation and transformation through colour, materials and composition. Painterly precision, a vibrant colour palette and a keen eye for composition coalesce into works that are accessible and seductive but, at the same time, continue a long-standing art-historical dialogue between observation and the imagination. Party is also interested in the power of paint to alter our perception of the built environment and, within a gallery context, how we experience art. To this end, he regularly paints murals, either as stand-alone works or as carefully orchestrated settings for his paintings.

His work has been exhibited internationally including recent solo exhibitions at FLAG Art Foundation, New York (2019); M WOODS, Beijing (2018-2019); and Magritte Museum, Brussels (2018).

Works