Zhu Tian 朱田

China born, London-based artist Zhu Tian received an MA in Sculpture from the Royal College of Art in London, the UK (2014), an MA in Sound Design from Bournemouth University in Bournemouth, the UK (2007), and a BA in Economics from the University of Nottingham in Nottingham, the UK (2006). Moving effortlessly from object intervention to digital to performance to set piece installation, she presents works embodying discourse around the theme of power relations, freedom and individualism. Concerned by the automated routines of robotic individuals in today’s society, Zhu creates pieces which she describes as “hiccups – to interrupt and disturb.” Her work combines light humour with a sharp sense of critique, and is known for being ‘compelling and unsettling’.

Zhu has exhibited internationally at such venues as the V&A Museum in London, the UK, the Palais de Tokyo in Paris, France and the Centraal Museum in Utrecht, Netherlands. She was the winner of the Catlin Art Prize (UK) in 2015, the Broomhill National Sculpture Prize (UK) in 2014, and was selected as the Emerging Sound Artist in the UK in 2009.

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Jonas Wood

In his paintings, drawings, and prints, Jonas Wood merges references to art history, his memories, and visions of the people, objects, and settings that compose the fabric of his life. Working in acrylic and oil on supports including cardboard and canvas, he presents portraits of his friends and family, interior scenes, and still lifes. Through his partially abstract rendering of these subjects and use of bright colors, he emphasizes patterns and forms while flattening out the space in his compositions. Ceramic vessels and potted plants figure prominently in his works. In some, he covers the outside of a plant’s pot with an intricately realized landscape, which reads as a painting within a painting. Working with an eye toward his predecessors, Wood cites Lucian Freud, David Hockney, and Alex Katz as influences, claiming, “All three of them are superheroes.”

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Emilio Tadini

Emilio Tadini (b. 1927 – d. 2002 Milan, Italy) is considered one of the most original personalities of Italy’s post- World War II cultural landscape. A Poet, novelist, essayist, art critic, journalist and painter, he is, in the words of friend and contemporary Umberto Eco, “A writer who paints, a painter who writes.”

In 1947 he debuted with a poem in Elio Vittorini’s magazine Politecnico, which was followed by intense critical and theoretical writings on art. From 1963 to 1993 Tadini published four novels and a volume of poems. It was alongside his critical and literary work, from the late 1950s Tadini began to paint. His first solo exhibition was in 1961 at the Galleria del Cavallino in Venice, and then in 1965, in a group show, together with Mario Schifano, Valerio Adami and Lucio Del Pezzo at the newly opened Studio Marconi in Milan. 

Although stylistically ‘Pop’ Tadini, rather than the superficial gloss of American Pop Art, was greater interested in the more introspective, personal, and at times intellectual British Pop Art such as Peter Blake, David Hockney and Allen Jones, but also to that of Francis Bacon, Patrick Caufield, Ronald Kitaj, and the figurative narratives of Valerio Adami and Hervé Télémaque.

During the 1970s he had solo exhibitions in Paris, Stockholm, Brussels, London, Antwerp, the United States and Latin America, both in private galleries and museums. In 1978 and 1982 Tadini participated in the Venice Biennale, and in 1986 he had a large solo exhibition at the Rotonda di via Besana in Milan. From autumn 1995 to the summer of 1996 a major retrospective took place in the museums of Stralsund, Bochum and Darmstad. In spring 2005, the Villa dei Cedri Museum in Bellinzona had a large posthumous retrospective of his work. The Mayor Gallery in London from whom this wonderful bio is taken had an extensive exhibition of his work in February and March 2020.

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Julian Opie

Julian Opie was born in 1958 in London and graduated in 1983 from Goldsmiths School of Art, where he was taught by Michael Craig-Martin. He lives and works in London.

The work of Julian Opie is known throughout the world. With public commissions from New York to Seoul, London to Zurich, and an uninterrupted flow of international museum exhibitions, Opie’s distinctive formal language is instantly recognisable and reflects his artistic preoccupation with the idea of representation and the means by which images are perceived and understood. “Everything you see is a trick of the light,” Opie writes. “Light bouncing into your eye, light casting shadows, creating depth, shapes, colours. Turn off the light and it’s all gone. We use vision as a means of survival and it’s essential to take it for granted in order to function, but awareness allows us to look at looking and by extension look at ourselves and be aware of our presence. Drawing, drawing out the way that process feels and works brings the awareness into the present and into the real world, the exterior world.” Always exploring different techniques both cutting edge and ancient, Opie plays with ways of seeing through reinterpreting the vocabulary of everyday life; his reductive style evokes both a visual and spatial experience of the world around us. Drawing influence from classical portraiture, Egyptian hieroglyphs and Japanese woodblock prints, as well as public signage, information boards and traffic signs, the artist connects the clean visual language of modern life, with the fundamentals of art history.

Exhibitions have been staged at Berardo Museum, Lisbon, Portugal (2020); Tokyo Opera City Art Gallery, Japan (2019); Gerhardsen Gerner, Oslo, Norway (2019); The National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, Australia (2018); National Portrait Gallery, London, UK (2017); Suwon Ipark Museum of Art, Korea (2017); Fosun Foundation, Shanghai, China (2017); Fundacion Bancaja, Valencia, Spain (2017); Kunsthalle Helsinki, Finland (2015); Museum of Contemporary Art Krakow (MoCAK), Poland (2014); National Portrait Gallery, London, UK (2011); IVAM, Valencia, Spain (2010);

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Sterling Ruby

Sterling Ruby (born January 21, 1972) is an American artist who works in a large variety of media including ceramics, painting, drawing, collage, sculpture, video, and textiles. Often, his work is presented in large and densely packed installations. The artist has cited a diverse range of sources and influences including aberrant psychologies (particularly schizophrenia and paranoia), urban gangs and graffiti, hip-hop culture, craft, punk, masculinity, violence, public art, prisons, globalization, American domination and decline, waste and consumption. In opposition to the minimalist artistic tradition and influenced by the ubiquity of urban graffiti, the artist’s works often appear scratched, defaced, camouflaged, dirty, or splattered. Proclaimed as one of the most interesting artists to emerge this century by New York Times art critic Roberta Smith, Ruby’s work examines the psychological space where individual expression confronts social constraint.

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Adam McEwan

Adam McEwen is a contemporary British artist whose Conceptual pieces fall between painting, sculpture, and installation. His most famous works might be his obituaries written for living luminaries—Jeff Koons and Kate Moss among them—subverting his prior work as author of these announcements. The black-and-white prints echo the layout and sentiment of real journalism, yet McEwen’s fictions offer alternative views of celebrity. “An obituary is a narrative of someone’s decisions…. And in a sense it’s optimistic, and in another sense it’s impossible, and that’s like making art,” McEwen has said of the series. Born on February 9, 1965 in London, England, McEwen received a BA in English literature at Christ Church College, Oxford University, before studying at the California Institute of the Arts in 1991. Currently living and working in New York, NY, the artist transforms ordinary objects, such as ATMs and air conditioners, and ideas through inventive use of materials, typography, and presentation.

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Nicolas Party

Nicolas Party (born 1980 in Lausanne, Switzerland) lives and works in New York. He is one of the rising stars of the contemporary art market and already has a global presence and following. He is both widely collected and exhibited and is perhaps the most popular and respected artist of his generation. These small masterworks are gifted to those who work with him, they are unique entirely hand painted works in a series which varies upon the chosen theme. 

Party works across a wide range of different media. Primarily known for his colour-saturated paintings and murals, he also makes painted sculptures, pastels, installations, prints and drawings, and works as a curator. Party often paints landscapes, portraits and still lifes of everyday objects, which he strips of all extraneous detail. Rather than creating faithful depictions from nature, he uses these seemingly innocuous subjects as springboards for an exploration into the art of painting itself. His concerns lie, therefore, less in the accurate depiction of nature, and more in its translation and transformation through colour, materials and composition. Painterly precision, a vibrant colour palette and a keen eye for composition coalesce into works that are accessible and seductive but, at the same time, continue a long-standing art-historical dialogue between observation and the imagination. Party is also interested in the power of paint to alter our perception of the built environment and, within a gallery context, how we experience art. To this end, he regularly paints murals, either as stand-alone works or as carefully orchestrated settings for his paintings.

His work has been exhibited internationally including recent solo exhibitions at FLAG Art Foundation, New York (2019); M WOODS, Beijing (2018-2019); and Magritte Museum, Brussels (2018).

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Thomas Ruff

Thomas Ruff (born 10 February 1958) is a German photographer who lives and works in Düsseldorf, Germany. He has been described as “a master of edited and reimagined images”.

Ruff shares a studio on Düsseldorf’s Hansaallee, with other German photographers Laurenz Berges, Andreas Gursky and Axel Hütte. The studio, a former municipal electricity station, includes a basement gallery.

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Mario Giacomelli

Mario Giacomelli  (1925-2000) was born Senigallia, Italy. As a young man, he worked as a typographer, painting on weekends and writing poetry. Inspired by the wartime movies of filmmakers like Fellini, Giacomelli taught himself photography.  The Italian photographer Giuseppe Cavalli had moved to Senigallia and was eager to form a club that would promote photography as art. In 1953 the Misa club was formed, with officers Cavalli as president and Giacomelli as treasurer. In 1956, Giacomelli joined the La Bussola group of photographers and then the national ANSA agency. He specialised in black-and-white land scenes, devising his own way of shooting, using the little-known Kobell Press camera.  

In 1954 Giacomelli began to photograph the home for the elderly where his mother had worked, completing the series in 1983. Empathetic but grittily unsentimental, the pictures show many women seemingly marooned in the sea of old age. In 1985-87, Giacomelli revisited the subject for his series ”Ninna Nanna,” which means lullaby. In this series,  the deeply lined, gaunt faces of the aged are a bleak counterpoint to the bold lines and patterns found in the fields and on the sides of houses.


Other important photographic essays that Giacomelli executed were the 1957-59 series entitled “Scanno,” named for an impoverished town in the Abruzzi region of central Italy. In the 1960s, Giacomelli worked on the project entitled ”No hands caress my face”, better known as the ”Pretini” series taken in the seminary of Senigallia and later shown at Cologne Photokina in 1963.

Starting in the mid-1950s, Giacomelli began to win photographic prizes and exhibit in group shows many of which focused on post-war humanistic photography, such as the exhibition entitled, “What is Man?” that originated in Frankfurt and then travelled internationally.  In 1975, the British photographer Bill Brandt selected Giacomelli for his major exhibition, “The Land: 20th Century Landscape Photographs,” shown at the Victoria & Albert Museum in London.  In 1980, Giacomelli published his first and only solo book, Mario Giacomelli, fotografe, edited by Angelo Schwarz. 

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Kadar Brock

Kadar Brock (born May 28, 1980) is a contemporary abstract artist. He graduated in 2002 with a BFA from Cooper Union School of Art in New York City. He lives and works in Brooklyn, New York.

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